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I logged on one or two days ago to find this question in the "close votes" review queue. After looking at it a few times, I decided that I agreed with the previous accusation of it being opinion based.

Mentor vs Cornerman: What are the major differences between these roles?

This sentence by itself seems on topic, since that's asking for the difference, not an opinion. However:

For example:

  • Trust level
  • Confidence in advice given
  • Formal vs informal relationship
  • Things you talk about

This is where it gets iffy. This criteria will be different from person to person, so any answers given on this question would most likely state a personal preference or opinion. By preemptively closing this question, we eliminate the risk of arguments and overall discussion in the comments.

Vote now!

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    Agreed that if this about what the differences are between the roles, it would be on-topic. – Macaco Branco May 21 at 18:22
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    @MacacoBranco - unfortunately, it's not about that. – LemmyX May 21 at 18:42
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As written, the question is definitely opinion-based, but I think the question is easily editable to be on-topic, and I have tried to do so.

First, let me address this statement:

By preemptively closing this question, we eliminate the risk of arguments and overall discussion in the comments.

Both martial arts and the Internet are places that people will almost always disagree in some way. This is expected. Martial arts is also not like mathematics where statements are universally verifiable boolean propositions.

The point of the question and answer design is that commonly asked questions are searchable with answers that are helpful to future users. Framing questions to be useful to others is key. "Why would someone choose one over the other?" is more informative for future users than "What would you choose?".

This criteria will be different from person to person, so any answers given on this question would most likely state a personal preference or opinion.

This is an unreasonable criterion to close a question. Let's take some of your questions:

Is it necessary to practice falling on concrete to help prepare for a real life situation?

Here the are basically two viewpoints: falling on mats is sufficient, or not. But it's not the opinion itself that is useful, it's the explanation that will be helpful to future readers. It's good and healthy to disagree about the answers to questions like this. [Thanks for asking it!]

Is it okay to get a custom belt if you're not a black belt?

This is a question about etiquette, which basically means that the answer is solely based on people's opinions. If you did not care about what your social group would think about haing a custom belt, there would be no reason to ask this question.


I am also willing to be overridden on this. I don't think this is a great question and it is only marginally on topic, so if you think it should still be closed, then vote to close.

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  • I did vote to close earlier on, but I'm thinking I should maybe retract it. I do agree that it's fine to ask for opinions, but the question doesn't really give very much detail, thus difficult to answer. Note that the user posted an answer themselves, but I'm not sure what they are trying to say with it. – LemmyX May 24 at 23:47

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